Many entrepreneurs and businesses in tech, particularly in Miami, complain about the lack of talent (incidentally in Miami, it’s never a lack of affordable talent, just talent) when it comes to hiring for their companies. Conversely, many of the young professionals, college grads, and others complain of a lack of opportunities and jobs available.

There are hundreds of new programmers graduating every year in South Florida across the handful of colleges, and hundreds more moving to the area from Latin America, Europe, and other parts of the country. On the other side of the coin at any moment there are hundreds of jobs in software engineering on indeed.com in South Florida.

So where is the disconnect? Its quite simple actually: training costs. Corporations are not willing to train and assume the costs of training these individuals on the skill set they need to work in their enterprises. Corporations want people “ready to go” in obscure skillsets or proprietary tools. These people don’t exist. The universities on the other hand refuse to train their students in vocational manners, preferring to give them theoretical base, and then hoping they learn on the job the applicable skillset. At the end of the day no one wants to take on the costs associated with fixing this talent shortage. As a result we have this vicious cycle.

Is there a solution? Sure, third parties. Refresh Miami is going to attempt to solve this in part through our upcoming fall workshop curriculum. Though that won’t be a true substitute for intensive training funded by companies or schools.